February, 2014


GIS Learning

Roger Tomlinson, 1967.Roger Tomlinson, 1967.

Sunday Maptinee: Data for Decisions

In honor of Roger Tomlinson (1933-2014), who recently died, this edition of Sunday Maptinee features Data for Decisions, a video created in 1967 to highlight the emerging technology of geographic information systems (GIS).  Hosted by Roger Tomlinson, Data for Decisions is a film from the National Film Board of Canada created […]

Spatial Analysis

A selection of 20 comparable false colour image chips (bands 1-8-5) of probable whales found by the automated analysis. Several of the images could be interpreted as whale pairs, or as a mother and calf, others may be displaying behaviour such as tail slapping, rolling or blowing. On several images there is a strong return at one end of the feature which is mostly likely the calluses on the whales head. Reprinted under a CC BY license with permission from British Antarctic Survey and DigitalGlobe.

Tracking Whales with Satellite Imagery

Researchers with the British Antarctic Survey have developed a methodology to use unsupervised classification to remotely identify and count right whale populations near Golfo Nuevo, Península Valdés in Argentina using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite imagery.

GIS Learning

New Book About GIS in US Federal Government

Esri has released the fourth volume in its “Mapping the Nation” series entitled, “Mapping the Nation: Supporting Decisions that Govern a People“.  This volume takes a look at how GIS is used within US Federal Government agencies to ” evaluate and respond to social, economic, and environmental concerns at local, regional, national, […]

Spatial Analysis

Automated Generalization: The Holy Grail for National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies?

Automated Generalization: The Holy Grail for National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies?

This guest article by Nicolas Regnauld, Product Manager at 1Spatial takes a look at automated generalization and how this holy grail has come closer for national mapping and cartographic agencies. For generations, the process of creating lower-resolution and smaller scale products from a single high-resolution data source has been a very labor-intensive process. Automation means organizations can do away with interpretation methodologies and so-called “cartographers license”. Automation can provide continuous, up-to-date and resolution-specific digital landscape models (DLM) and style-specific, digital cartographic models (DCM).