Building Attribute and Value Crosswalks Using Esri’s Data Interoperability Extension

Filed in GIS Software and Applications by on January 15, 2013
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Nathan Lebel, a GIS Analyst with Geographic Information Services, Inc. (GISI is a professional services GIS consulting firm), provides an introduction to a recent article about building building attribute and value crosswalks using Esri’s Data Interoperability Extension.  

The Esri Data Interoperability Extension gives GIS professionals the ability to build complex spatial extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) tools. Traditionally the crosswalking of feature classes and attributes is done prior to setting up the migration tools and is used only as a guide. The drawback to this method is that it takes a considerable amount of time to build the crosswalks and then to build the ETL tools.

GISI’s article, “Building Attribute and Value Crosswalks in ESRI Data Interoperability Extension the Scalable/Dynamic Way” outlines the use of the SchemaMapper transformer within Data Interoperability Extension which can pull crosswalk information directly from properly formatted tables. For large projects this means you can store crosswalk information in a single repository and point each ETL tool to that repository without needing to manage multiple crosswalk documents. For projects that might change during the lifecycle of the project the use of SchemaMapper means that changes can be made to the repository without requiring any additional changes to the ETL tool. There are three examples used in this article which encompasses a majority of crosswalking tasks; feature class to feature class, attribute to attribute, and attribute value to attribute value crosswalking. All of the examples use CSV files to store the crosswalk information; however the transformer can pull directly from RDBMS tables as well which gives you the ability to build a user interface to create and update crosswalks which is recommended for large scale projects.

The full article can be accessed on GISI’s blog or as a PDF or Ebook in either EPUB or Kindle or format.

Setting up the ETL to route source feature classes to their correct destination feature classes  to their correct destination feature classes based on what is listed in the source CSV file.

Setting up the ETL to route source feature classes to their correct destination feature classes to their correct destination feature classes based on what is listed in the source CSV file.

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